Where Can I Go For Help?

Alzheimer's Law Firms

Discover What You Need To Know So You're Never Out of Money and Out of Options Our Free Alzheimer's Resource Kit Reveals The Secrets

Please click on the link for the Alzheimer's Law Firm location nearest to you.
*Don't see your state? Click here to email us to request more information on an Alzheimer's Law Firm near you.

State Name E-Mail Phone Number
California SJ Elder Law gcummings@senioradvocates.net (408) 513-3626
Illinois Law Offices of Anthony B. Ferraro aferraro@senioradvocates.net (847) 221-0154
Illinois Law ElderLaw, LLP rlaw@senioradvocates.net (630) 874-0331
Michigan The Elder & Disability Law Firm, PLLC tschmitz@senioradvocates.net (586) 298-3026
Missouri Vouga Elder Law, LLC rvouga@senioradvocates.net (636) 594-8600
Ohio Jarvis Law Office tjarvis@senioradvocates.net (614) 358-0105
Texas Lance ElderLaw clance@senioradvocates.net (512) 501-3654
Washington Margaret Madison Phelan P.S. mphelan@senioradvocates.net (360) 713-5713


As elder law attorneys, we assume a law practice that we see as a calling. We did not choose elder law as a calculated business decision; rather, due to the frailty of someone we love… elder law chose us.

Clients rely upon us for more than traditional legal advice. We help clients and families put together the “aging puzzle” with its many ill-fitting pieces of frail health, caregiving needs, survivor care concerns, financial decisions, residential options, family relationships, insufficient assets, substitute decision-makers, cumbersome probate, end-of-life decisions, and much more. In fact, the legal advice we provide is often the least complicated piece of our client's aging puzzle.

Because of the nature of our typical elder law representation, it is particularly important that we spend time educating our clients and their families to understand the attorney-client relationship. We have a duty not only to represent our client, but to guide them. Our client is usually the senior, however many times the client's adult children have an agenda which conflicts with that of the senior. We strive to mediate family conflicts and seek our client's best interests.

We often see that when clients get information from other sources, whether it's the government, a care facility, their banker, or even another family member, our clients may receive not only conflicting information, but downright incorrect information. The person giving the answers may be well-meaning, but it is not their job to put the senior-client's interests first. Unfortunately, many advisors must put their employer's (or their own) interests first. The elder law attorney acts as the filtering advocate for the frail senior. Our code of legal responsibility demands that we place our client's interests first.

We must do what we are called to do as holistic professionals. The scope of our legal services is defined by the client's overall circumstances - and not just their legal issues. We work at the juncture of estate planning, disability, Medicare, Medicaid, VA benefits, financial planning, health care, family dynamics, tax law, and medicine. We must collaborate with a network of other capable professionals. We seek to make our elder law practice “transformational” rather than “transactional.” We must do more than legal task fulfillment such as resolving a dispute, drafting a document, or closing a real estate deal. As elder law attorneys, we empower lives for the better in a way which will impact whole families in years to come. We believe that we are providing important services our clients cannot get anywhere else.

We strive to be trustworthy guides along the Elder Care Journey©. As we look into the eyes of the aged and the infirm, we see our future selves reflected back to us. We give to our clients the same compassion, comfort, and care that we hope someone will offer to us when it comes our turn.

Written by elder law attorney Dennis Toman, CELA, of Greensboro, North Carolina. His website is www.elderlawfirm.com

» How to identify a real elder law attorney

Make Life Better Today

Make a list of priorities of your loved one's needs, both financial and personal. Your elder law attorney will usually be able to recommend some community resources to help manage both. Look at www.NAELA.com to find an attorney in your area. Make the call and schedule the appointment.

Make Life Better This Week

Get your loved one's paperwork in order to see your elder law attorney.

Make Life Better This Month

Follow up quickly from your first meeting - the sooner you allow your attorney to get your loved one's financial house in order, the better.